83Plus:Ports:04

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Synopsis

Port Number: 04h

Function: Interrupting Device Identification and Memory Map Control

See also: 83Plus:Interrupts, 83Plus:Memory_Mapping

This port serves two purposes. When read it indicates the device that triggered an interrupt. When written it sets the memory map mode and hardware timer speed. When an interrupt is triggered, it should be cleared by reseting the corresponding bit in port 3. Otherwise, it will continuously call the interrupt code once interrupts are reenabled with ei.

Read Values

  • Bits 0~2 and 4~7 are set according to which device triggered the running interrupt.
    • Bit 0: Set if pressing the ON Key triggered the interrupt.
    • Bit 1: Set if the first hardware timer triggered the interrupt.
    • Bit 2: Set if the second hardware timer triggered the interrupt.
    • Bit 4: Link activity generated an interrupt.
    • 83+SE / 84+ only: Bit 5: First crystal timer has expired.
    • 83+SE / 84+ only: Bit 6: Second crystal timer has expired.
    • 83+SE / 84+ only: Bit 7: Third crystal timer has expired.
  • Bit 3 is reset if the ON key is being pressed, set otherwise.

Write Values

  • Bit 0 reset to select memory map mode 0. In mode 0 the RAM and ROM is mapped to CPU memory as follows:
    • Address 0000h ~ 3FFFh: ROM Page 0
    • Address 4000h ~ 7FFFh: Memory Bank A (Page selected in Port 06h)
    • Address 8000h ~ BFFFh: Memory Bank B (Page selected in Port 07h)
    • 83+ Basic: Address C000h ~ FFFFh: RAM Page 0
    • Everything else: Address C000h ~ FFFFh: Page selected in Port 05h
  • Bit 0 set to select memory map mode 1. In mode 1 the RAM and ROM is mapped to CPU memory as follows:
    • Address 0000h ~ 3FFFh: ROM Page 0
    • Address 4000h ~ 7FFFh: Memory Bank A, even page (value of port 06h ANDed with FEh)
    • 83+ Basic: Address 8000h ~ BFFFh: Memory Bank A (Page selected in Port 06h)
    • Everything else: Address 8000h ~ BFFFh: Memory Bank A, odd page (value of port 06h ORed with 1)
    • Address C000h ~ FFFFh: Memory Bank B (Page selected in Port 07h)
  • Bits 1 and 2 control the hardware timer frequency. Setting both 0 sets the timer to the fastest speed, and both 1 is the slowest speed. The normal speed is with both bits 1.
Frequency (Hz)
  first timer second timer both enabled
value 83+ 83+SE 84+(SE) 83+ 83+SE 84+(SE) 83+ 83+SE 84+(SE)
00 560 512 1120 1024 1680 1536
01 248 227.55 497 455.11 746 682.66
10 170 146.29 344 292.57 517 438.86
11 118 107.79 236 215.58 353 323.37
  • Bits 3~5: Unused.
  • Bits 6 and 7:
    • 83+ Basic: No function
    • Everything else: These two bits are used to determine the battery state. They act as a 2-bit number and the higher it is, the higher the voltage cutoff for bit 0 of Port 2. Unless you are trying to determine battery state, these two bits should be zero.
      • TI-83+SE: Only has one bit, bit 7; the second bit was added for the 84-series.
      • TI-84+/SE: Numbers 00 and 10 are not currently used. 01 measures if the batteries are removed (0v). 11 measures if the main batteries are present but "low".
      • TI-84+CSE: Based on the OS battery check routine, these two bits are in reverse order; that is, bit 6 is more significant than bit 7. (This probably also applies to the B&W models.) The routine always delays between changing these bits and checking bit 0 of port 2. Also, for each check value, it writes 06 (i.e. resets the port) and then writes the value it intends to write. It writes, in order, 06, 86, 46, C6. If bit 0 of port 2 is reset after any of those writes, it returns 0 through 3, respectively; if bit 0 of port 2 remains set after all of those writes, it returns 4. Bit 7 of port 3A is also related; that bit is normally kept reset, but is set for the duration of the test routine.

Comments

The calculator uses memory mapping mode 0 for normal operation. If you change the memory map mode be sure to change it back before returning control. Also, do not switch from mode 0 to mode 1 inside the 4000h ~ 7FFFh range unless you've changed the RAM Execution Limits with ports 25 and 26. This is because switching modes in this manner will start executing on RAM page 0, which will crash under normal conditions.

Interrupt timers may not be independent of the CPU speed for the 83+. However on the 83+SE, 84+ and 84+SE the standard timers are based on the crystal timer. Timer1 fires at 32768/(64+(80*i))hz, where i is bit 1 and 2 set in port 4, making it 0<=i<=3.

Example

This example shows successful use of this port, switching to mode 1 and back. Mode 1 is the only way to execute code beyond address C000h on the 83+ Basic, unless you use a combination of ports 5 and 16 to enable execution on RAM page 00. (Assumes code is running from 4000h (i.e. an application))

 in a, (7) ;Save current Bank B page because we'll trash it.
 push af
 in a,(6) ;Put this app's page into 8000
 out (7), a
 jp $ + 4003h ;This will actually jump to the next statement, but in Bank B.
 ld a, 77h ;Select mode 1 and keep the timer speed at normal...
 out (4), a ;Now we're in mode 1.
 ;We're still at 8000h here but we are back in Bank A.
 ;Now to go back.
 ld a, 76h ;I could dec a for this example, but...
 out (4), a ;Back in mode 0 and bank B.
 jp $ - 3FFDh ;Jump back to bank A.
 pop af
 out (7), a ;Restore bank B.

Credits and Contributions

  • Dan Englender: Originally documented memory map modes here
  • Michael Vincent: For his docs here, which helped me figure out the interrupt device bits.
  • James Montelongo: For his docs here on the hardware timer.